The Phospholipid Advantage

Superba™ Krill is powered by The Phospholipid Advantage-getting more omega-3s to the places you need them most.
The Difference Between
Triglycerides & Phospholipids
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Superba™ Krill is rich in phospholipid omega-3s EPA and DHA, which are more bio-efficient than other marine oils. Phospholipid-bound omega-3 fatty acids are water dispersible, making them gentler on the stomach and more readily absorbed by the body. And with phospholipid omega-3s, less is more—smaller capsules are easy to swallow, easy to digest (no more burps!), and better absorbed by the body.

Phospholipids are natural, integral parts of cells—they are structural components of cell surface membranes and the membranes within the cells. In the case of Superba™ Krill, the majority of the EPA and DHA omega-3s are bound to phospholipids. In contrast, other marine oil omega-3s have EPA and DHA bound to triglycerides, the form of fats the body uses for energy—a form that is also stored as body fat for future energy needs.

The physical characteristics of triglycerides differ from phospholipids and this affects how they are tolerated by the body. One clear difference is that triglycerides don’t disperse and have a tendency to float on top of stomach fluids, which can result in the fishy burps often associated with fish oil supplements. On the other hand, phospholipid omega-3s do disperse in water and are easily blended in the stomach fluids, which is why there is no fishy aftertaste when you take Superba™ Krill.

Superba™ Krill provides omega-3s in phospholipid form, mainly as phosphatidylcholine. Omega-3 availability is increased when delivered by phospholipids compared with other sources, due to more efficient absorption of omega-3 phospholipids in the small intestine. After absorption, phosphatidylcholine is incorporated into cell membranes where it participates in fatty acid transport in blood and across membranes.

Lysophosphatidylcholine is thought to impact the distribution of fatty acids to the body’s organs and tissues because of its role in lipoprotein assemblages, which serve as vehicles that transport fatty acids via blood serum. In certain animal models, after removing phosphatidylcholine from the diet, a significant reduction in the transport of fatty acids to tissues, accompanied by accumulation of fat in the liver, has been observed.